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Defining "Craft" Beer... 7 years 11 months ago #1

Brewdog weighs in:

[url:17loaqwr]http://www.brewdog.com/blog-article/defining-craft-beer[/url:17loaqwr]

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Defining "Craft" Beer... 7 years 11 months ago #2

Nice to see a commitment to ingredients labelling, but I can't see this campaign going much further.

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Defining "Craft" Beer... 7 years 11 months ago #3

I mostly agree with him. Not sure about the ingredients clause, it's hard to define if something is added to "lessen flavour and reduce costs". I know Dogfish Head use Corn in some of their beers anyway so where does that leave them?

We've examples in Ireland of the abuse of the word craft though. I'm thinking of Crean's brewing and bottling abroad and, imo, even worse, beer made by Molson Coors, in England, being sold as beer from Cork. Crean's are at least an Irish company.

And then with Diageo muscling in on the craft sector it's only going to make things harder for genuine craft breweries.

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Defining "Craft" Beer... 7 years 11 months ago #4

A few independent, regional breweries that survived Prohibition such as Yuengling and Schell's use maize to balance out the use of American 6 row barley to reproduce the effects of 2 row barley that 19th C German brewmaster would've used back home.

The Brewers Association controversially put them outside the fence for this, but I think the real reason was that these old school breweries didn't sit well with a group advocating for the new wave of craft.

I'd be interested to see if something similar might happen in the UK to consider medium-sized breweries making mediocre beer (Shepherd Neame: 370,000hl p.a.) as not craft beer.

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Defining "Craft" Beer... 7 years 11 months ago #5

A few independent, regional breweries that survived Prohibition such as Yuengling and Schell's use maize to balance out the use of American 6 row barley to reproduce the effects of 2 row barley that 19th C German brewmaster would've used back home.

The Brewers Association controversially put them outside the fence for this, but I think the real reason was that these old school breweries didn't sit well with a group advocating for the new wave of craft.

I'd be interested to see if something similar might happen in the UK to consider medium-sized breweries making mediocre beer (Shepherd Neame: 370,000hl p.a.) as not craft beer.[/quote:www0xyha]


by which body? there's no definition and no governing body...its a self applied epithet here

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Defining "Craft" Beer... 7 years 11 months ago #6

by which body? [/quote:2nbvntv7]James Watt thinks it can be done once SIBA, CAMRA and The Brewers of Europe agree with him. And on the day that agreement takes effect you can grab your ice skates and pop down to Hell.

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