TOPIC:

Cool, not cold 7 years 11 months ago #7

Parlo, that's a fine temp guide but it's not what I experienced in Edinburgh. Or Glasgow for that matter.

Also, it is impractical for Irish pubs to keep different beers at different temps. Our market is too small to justify that expense.
I know what you are saying but it will not happen perfectly over here and from experience, nor does it in any part of the UK I have been to.
Cask ale is usually served at the correct temperature over there, unless very hot outside. Same goes here to a lesser degree.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Cool, not cold 7 years 11 months ago #8

I was in Edinburgh last month. I found the kegged beers quite cold, the same as here. I found the cask far too warm but it was during the heatwave.
Too cold is better than too warm. Cold will warm up.

That said, many beers are sold too cold here.[/quote:3usoncdr]

That is the difference. The big keg beer manufacturers are brainwashing drinkere into thinking beer should be really cold. I have even fould myself returning a warm beer, The staff claim It should be served 'warm'. I think it's down to lack of knownledge and understanding of beer, by the pub staff and management

A good example, in what I'm trying to say:
We have regular & 'extra cold' and Guinness. Lets say, served at 7oC and 4oC respective
Lets say we had regular & extra cold cask ale, served at 11oC and 7oC

Hence the topic 'COOL NOT COLD@

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Cool, not cold 7 years 11 months ago #9

What's a big keg manufacturer? Do you mean the likes of Carlsberg?
Or the likes of brewdog and any other UK craft brewery that kegs?
I'm only referring to the craft brewers in the UK.

I get what you are saying of course, though temperature preference varies from country to country. And it is just a preference after all.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Cool, not cold 7 years 11 months ago #10

So, are you saying that cask and keg ale should both be served at the same temperature? Does that happen anywhere?[/quote:31zsl2yh]

Parlo, that's a fine temp guide but it's not what I experienced in Edinburgh. Or Glasgow for that matter. [/quote:31zsl2yh]

The beernut 1st

What do ou mean by keg ale? Is it Keg conditioned?- Unpasturised/unfiltered aka has yeast in it? If so it should be stored and served around 11oC

Now for Saruman

As I said in m last post, I believe it's a lack of Knowledge in the pubs. If you're ever over in the uk again, Pick up a copy CAMRA's good beer guide, find the nearest brewery, arrange a tour.
Or If ou're in Glasgow any September, find out if the Bon Accord, State, or 3 judges bars are taking part in the Open Doors tour

They'll know more than me

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Cool, not cold 7 years 11 months ago #11

What's a big keg manufacturer? Do you mean the likes of Carlsberg?
Or the likes of brewdog and any other UK craft brewery that kegs?
I'm only referring to the craft brewers in the UK.

I get what you are saying of course, though temperature preference varies from country to country. And it is just a preference after all.[/quote:2sq542ym]

I do mean the likes of carlsberg. As you said, it varies from country to country. Each country has their own styles of beer/ingredients and climate. Since Ireland is similar to the UK that way. The serving should be similar

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Cool, not cold 7 years 11 months ago #12

What do ou mean by keg ale?[/quote:1l639ba1]Beer served from a pressurised keg. Most of the craft ale you would have had in Ireland would have been keg. Cask you would have recognised, from the handpump.

Is it Keg conditioned?- Unpasturised/unfiltered aka has yeast in it? If so it should be stored and served around 11oC[/quote:1l639ba1]And if not? Irish craft ales are almost always filtered and force-carbonated.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Time to create page: 0.217 seconds