Beoir - Supporting Craft Beer in Ireland
Sunday, August 25, 2019
   
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Beoir Membership Benefits
Places that stock Irish Craft Beer
Irish Craft Breweries
Beoir Membership Benefits By joining Beoir, you help us to raise awareness of Irish Craft Beer and we give you back far more than your joining fee in benefits. You can read more about joining Beoir here. Join Now   Read the Full Story
Places that stock Irish Craft Beer Finding beer from Ireland's craft breweries can be a daunting task. We are not yet at the stage where one can walk into any pub in Ireland and find something brewed locally. However, the beer is available and for the discerning drinker it is simply a matter of knowing where to look. Read the Full Story
Irish Craft Breweries The number of craft breweries in Ireland has been growing over the past few years, providing greater choice and quality to beer and cider consumers on the island of Ireland. Beoir maintains a list of these breweries so you can learn where you can find them and what they make. Read the Full Story

What is Beoir?

Beoir is an independent group of consumers with a primary goal of supporting and raising awareness of Ireland's native independent microbreweries. You can read more about Beoir or learn how to join, here. There are some fantastic benefits for members.

The Beoir Directory

Beoir maintains a directory listing the micro breweries on the island of Ireland and, more importantly, the bars and restaurants where you can enjoy their produce. Find the places near you on our directory or download the BeoirFinder app.

Review: Around Brussels in 80 Beers

Book Cover Earlier this year I made my first trip to Brussels. I didn't have a guidebook, although fellow ICBers had made some great suggestions that I had fully intended following up. As it turns out, I ended up having the next best thing to a guide book: Joe Stange. Joe agreed to meet me while he was literally in the process of taking photos to finish the book he co-wrote with Belgian brewer Yvan de Baets, Around Brussels in 80 Beers. Joe took me on a whirlwind tour of some of the places the book mentions, so I thought I'd be well prepared to use these visits as a benchmark for what is described in the book.

 

 

Review: Amber Gold & Black

Cover of Amber Gold and BlackAmber Gold & Black - The Story of Britain's Great Beers is a unique kind of book. Written by Martyn Cornell, author of Beer: The Story of the Pint and beer writer of the year in 2003, Amber Gold & Black is published only in electronic format. As a result it is a low cost publication at £5 for a copy. A very cheap purchase considering the years of research that must have gone into creating this 233 page work.

Cornell's aim is to explore the true history of a range of beer types, including bitter, mild, IPA, porter, golden ales, wheat beer, barley wine, heather ale; the contents list 16 families of beer all with a distinct British history. Each chapter deals with its subject in a similar manner. Reaching back to the earliest references he could find, Cornell brings the reader on a journey through time, with anecdotes, statistics, lists of breweries, from the earliest references up to the present.

Review: Beer & Philosophy

Beer & PhilosophyThis collection of essays, sub-titled, "the unexamined beer isn't worth drinking", interprets its remit in a variety of ways. The great philosophers had very little to say on the subject of beer and there's only so many times one can make a pun about alcohol measured in degrees Plato -- here it's done early to have it out of the way. Some articles are simply about the brewing world and beer in general, given a slight philosophical twist. Many others are undergraduate philosophy lectures, peppered with examples from the beer world by way of illustration. A handful, however, undertake a fully philosophical examination of the enjoyment of beer. The quality is mixed, but the fifteen essays are at least short and if the reader is bored with the current one, the next isn't too far away. To assist further, every page is illustrated with a pint of beer in the corner, full at the start of each essay and gradually emptying towards the end. Not only does the book tell you how far you still have to read, but it also indicates what stage of your drink you should be at, assuming one pint per chapter. It is, to my knowledge, the only philosophy textbook to do this.

Review: Beer & Cider in Ireland: The Complete Guide

beerciderguide.jpgIt should be a matter for public outcry that the complete guide to beer and cider in Ireland is pocket-sized. Neither is the completeness a publisher's idle boast: this densely packed little book covers everything from the extinct micros like Balbriggan and DBC, to those just getting going, like Shelta and Bluestack. You can find out how long it takes to mash a batch of Murphy's and which came first: Stag or Ritz. And there's more...

 

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